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Live Briefing: Russia Invades Ukraine

Updated

People receive bread at a humanitarian aid distribution spot in Zaporizhzhya on February 6.

RFE/RL's Live Briefing gives you all of the latest developments on Russia's ongoing invasion, how Kyiv is regaining territory, Western military aid, worldwide reaction, and the plight of civilians and refugees. For all of RFE/RL's coverage of the war, click here.

Latest Developments At A Glance

  • German Defense Minister Boris Pistorius has made a surprise visit to Kyiv, where he announced that Ukraine is to receive more than 100 battle tanks of the older Leopard 1 type from several European countries.
  • Russian invading forces continue to launch attacks along the front lines in eastern Ukraine, Kyiv’s military reported on February 7, as Ukrainian officials continued to warn that Moscow was preparing for a fresh offensive in the region.
  • Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy has been invited to take part in a summit of European Union leaders.
  • Ukrainian lawmakers on February 7 appointed Vasyl Malyuk to the post of chief of the Security Service (SBU) and Ihor Klymenko to the post of interior minister.
  • Ukraine's parliament approved changes to the 2023 state budget that raise state spending to support small businesses and channel more funds into reconstruction and recovery projects following Russia's invasion.
  • A fire broke out on February 7 at a drone factory in Latvia that has built drones for Ukraine's military and NATO allies.
  • Swedish Prime Minister Ulf Kristersson said he's ready to restart stalled negotiations over Sweden's application to join NATO as soon as Turkey is.
  • The Olympic committees of five Nordic countries have reiterated their opposition to allowing Russian and Belarusian athletes to take part in the 2024 Paris Olympics.
  • The UN's emergency relief coordinator, Martin Griffiths, said that nearly 8 million people have fled Ukraine since the beginning of Russia's invasion.
  • Slumping energy revenues and soaring expenditures pushed Russia's federal budget to a deficit of 1.76 trillion rubles ($24.78 billion) in January amid Western sanctions and the cost of the war in Ukraine.
  • Nearly one year into the war in Ukraine, Americans’ support for Kyiv holds steady, according to a Gallup poll.

Are Intensifying Russian Offensives An Omen Of Things To Come?

The tempo of fighting in the Donbas has increased markedly, with Russia pushing back Ukrainian forces reportedly at great costs. Is this a prelude to a predicted offensive? Or is it the offensive itself? Read Mike Eckel's report here.

Is The Ukraine War A Classic Case Of Wars Rarely, If Ever, Going As Planned? An Interview With Lawrence Freedman

British historian Lawrence Freedman specializes in international relations, foreign policy, and strategy. He has written academic works on the Cold War, nuclear deterrence, and the origins and course of the war in Ukraine. He spoke to RFE/RL's Georgian Service about the likelihood of total victory for either side, and why he doesn't think Putin will use a nuclear weapon. Read the interview here.

How Can Western Tanks Help Ukraine Drive Out Russian Forces?

Leopard 2 and Abrams tanks pledged by the West will give Ukraine a substantial boost in its fight against invading Russian forces, but numbers are a key factor and time is of the essence as the war grinds on and both sides prepare for possible offensives in the coming months, experts said. Read the full analysis by Todd Prince here.

Who Is The Latest General Picked By Putin To Oversee The Invasion Of Ukraine?

Three months ago, General Sergei Surovikin was charged with refocusing Russia's war on Ukraine. Now he's been demoted, and a rival general named the top commander. And with that, President Vladimir Putin has roiled the 11-month invasion, injecting Kremlin politics into the war with no end in sight. Read the story by Mike Eckel here.

Who Are The 'Partisans' At War With The Kremlin?

Mystery fires that have broken out across Russia in recent months have been blamed on Ukrainian saboteurs and even Western intelligence operatives. But a new documentary by British filmmaker Jake Hanrahan suggests a "large-scale, active resistance inside Russia" is now being waged by Russia's own citizens. Hanrahan talked to RFE/RL about the spate of attacks on war-related infrastructure inside Russia. Read the story by Amos Chapple here.

The moment Jake Hanrahan meets two anti-Kremlin partisans in a forest in Eastern Europe.
The moment Jake Hanrahan meets two anti-Kremlin partisans in a forest in Eastern Europe.
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